GPRSIM v3.0 has an antenna design menu where both the Receiver and Transmitter response functions can be set.   Ground coupled, air-coupled, bi-static, monostatic or horn antenna patterns can be used in GPRSIM simulations.
GPRSIM v3.0 has an antenna design menu where both the Receiver and Transmitter response functions can be set. Ground coupled, air-coupled, bi-static, monostatic or horn antenna patterns can be used in GPRSIM simulations.
GPRSIM v3.0 has an Impulse response function menu where synthetic pulses or pulses from the ground waves of real reecorded radargrams can be inserted for simulations
GPRSIM v3.0 has an Impulse response function menu where synthetic pulses or pulses from the ground waves of real reecorded radargrams can be inserted for simulations.
GPRSIM v3.0 has a WaveType menu for choosing the various energy paths pertinent to any particular model desgin.  The unique design of GPRSIM v3.0, is that contributin components of the raytraced wavefield can be separated.  This is important for removal of unwanted recorded energies in real radargrams. The menu is also designed for the user to type in their own uinique raypaths.
GPRSIM v3.0 has a WaveType menu for choosing the various energy paths pertinent to any particular model desgin. The unique design of GPRSIM v3.0, is that contributin components of the raytraced wavefield can be separated. This is important for removal of unwanted recorded energies in real radargrams. The menu is also designed for the user to type in their own uinique raypaths.

GPRSIM (c)  (1993-)    Ground  Penetrating  Radar  SIMulation

GPRSIM  is a completely interactive 2D forward modelling software designed specifically for ground penetrating radar.

GPRSIM predicts the full waveform of microwaves that are reflected, transmitted, refracted and attenuated across model ground structures.  (The complete theoretical details of GPRSIM are published in Geophysics, Goodman D., vol 59-2,  p224-232, 1994)

History:  GPRSIM began development in 1989 and was first coded in Fortran.  The software was converted to a DOS environment with self contained graphics.  The software was marketed by Geophysical Survey Systems, Inc., between 1994-1998 in which over 30 licenses were delivered.  The software was redeveloped in a Windows environment in 2001 and version 2.0 was released directly by the Geophysical Archaeometry Laboratory in 2001.  GPRSIM v3.0 was released in early 2006 and has been under continuous development at user requests.
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GPRSIM Software features:

  • exact ray tracing
  • exact model structural/slope specifications
  • wave attenuation, geometrical spreading
  • antenna design: receiver/transmitter directional responses
  • impulse design menu
  • conductive dissipation, dielectric relaxation EM propagation
  • wave polarization
  • mono-static, bi-static simulations
  • easy model creation draw menu with new features including dropdown targets
  • one click model recall
  • migration processing menu

Government agencies, universities, engineering/geotechnical companies and private organizations currently subscribing to GPRSIM Software for Windows:

  1. National Park Service, Nebraska
  2. CNR National Laboratories, Italy
  3. Walnut Ltd, Japan
  4. Saitobaru Archaeological Museum, Japan
  5. United States Geological Survey, Denver
  6. National Research Institute for Cultural Properties, Korea
  7. UCLA Cotsen Institute of Archaeology
  8. United States Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg MS
  9. Wofford College, South Carolina
  10. Joanneum, Austria
  11. Kyongbuk College of Science, Korea
  12. SOT Prospeccio, Spain
  13. Polytechnica University of Catalunya, Spain
  14. Dept of Anthropology, University of Mississippi
  15. Dept of Geology, Southern Illinois University
  16. Wiebe Group, Geo-Rail Division, Germany
  17. Polytechnic University of Valencia, Spain
  18. Dash Foundation
  19. TF1 Group, University of Vigo, Spain
  20. Zetica, England
  21. Samsung Engineering and Construction, Korea
  22. University of Central Florida
  23. The MITRE Corporation (www.mitre.org)
  24. Dokuz Eylul University, Turkey
  25. Dept of Geography, National University of Ireland
  26. Responsible Development, MDS, Paris, (www.mds-paris.com)
  27. Yangtze River Research Institute, China
  28. TGE Co. LTD, Korea
  29. Paichai University, Korea
  30. Department of Geosciences, University of Iowa
  31. Southwest University of Science and Technology, Sichuan Province, China
  32. Guiyang Hydropower Investigation Design and Research Institute, Guizhou Province, China
  33. CAI Arquoemetria y Analisis  Arqueologico, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain
  34. Archaeology Dept, University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
  35. Geophysics Dept. Orkney College, Scotlant
  36. Energy and Environment Research Laboratory, ITRI, Taiwan
  37. Dept of Geoscience, University of Iowa
  38. OYO, Japan
  39. Spanish Council of Scientific Research, Merida, Spain
  40. Yiba Highway, China
  41. Chang 'an University, Shangxi Province, China
  42. China 8th Railway Bureau
  43. China 11th Railway Bureau
  44. The Leon Recanati Maritime Institute, University of Haifu, Israel
  45. Underground Imaging Technologies LLC, Latham, New York
  46. Bandung Institute of Technology, West Java, Indonesia
  47. Instytut Badawczy Drog i Mostow w Warszawie, Poland
  48. Shijiazhuang Railway Institute, Hebei Province, China
  49. GroundProspections di Domenico Marchese, Potenza, Italy
  50. Anhui Province Water Resources Scientific Research Institute, China
  51. Institute of Earthquake Science of China Earthquake Administration
  52. Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China (http://english.hust.edu.cn/)
  53. The Chickasaw Nation of Oklahoma
  54. Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz, Germany
  55. Peking University, China
  56. Guilin University of Electronic Technology, China
  57. Archaeo-Geophysical Associates LLC, Maryland
  58. Shandong University, China
  59. Guizhou University, China
  60. University of Pisa, Italy
  61. Saint-Gobain Recherche, Paris, France
  62. GMB GmbH, Germany
  63. Larsen and Toubro Limited, Bangalore, India
  64. Dept of Geophysics, Aristotle University of Thessalonikki
  65. CTBTO Preparatory Commission Vienna, Austria
  66. Dutch National Police Agency KLPD, Netherlands
  67. Ingenieurgesellschaft PTM Dortmund mbH, Germany
  68. Sol-Solution, France
  69. Dept of Earth Sciences, University of Toronto, Canada
  70. Dept of Civil Engineering and Geoinformation, Oldenburg University"
  71. Consiglio Nacionale delle Ricerche, Rome
  72. Dept of Earth Sciences, University of Toronto, Canada
  73. Dept of Civil Engineering and Geoinformation, Oldenburg University, Germany
  74. Guangxi Communications Investment Group Co., Ltd, China
  75. Jiangsu Testing Center for Quality of Construction Engineering Co. China
  76. Tubitak Bilgem, Turkey
  77. Jiangsu Testing Center for Quality of Construction Engineering Co., China
  78. Tianjin Municipal Engineering Design and Research Institute, China
  79. Northeast Forestry University, Harbin, China
  80. China University of Petroleum, Qingdao, China
  81. Instituto Politecnico de Tomar, Portugal
  82. Ankara University, TUBITAK Projesi
  83. Jiangsu Province Water Conservancy Science Research Institute    
  84. Applied Physics Laboratory, The John Hopkins University
  85. Southwest Jiaotong University, China
  86. Third Engineering Group, Guangdong Construction Engineering, China
  87. Korean Expressway Corporation
  88. Parsons Overseas (P) Limited, India
  89. Gradar Geofysik, Italy-Sweden
  90. Beijing Tie Jian Project Supervision Co., Ltd., China
  91. Dept of Structures and Materials, IWHR BEIJING IWHR-KHL Co., Ltd, China
  92. Wehrtechnische Dienststelle für Schutz und Sondertechnik Oberjettenberg, Germany
  93. Beijing Constructional Engineering Institute, China
  94. Beijing Municipal Engineering Research Institute, China
  95. German Army
  96. IPA Electronik, Turkey
  97. Heritage Center, Stephen A Austin Univerity, Texas
  98. Draig Geoscience, Perth, Australia
  99. Research Institute of Building Science, Yunan Province, China
  100. Engineering Dept, University of Central Florida
  101. Sejong University, Korea
  102. China Railway Engineering Co., Ltd., Gansu Province, China
  103. Bureau of Cultural Heritage, Ministry of Culture, Taiwan
  104. Biosystems Engineering and Soil Sciences, University of Tennessee
  105. Geomecca Inc., Korea
  106. Dept of Civil Engineering, National Chiao Tung Univerity, Taiwan
  107. Tongji University, Shanghai City, China
  108. TIanjin Survey and Design Institute for Water Transport Engineering, China
  109. CCCC Shanghai San Hang Research Institute Co., Ltd., China
  110. Draper Laboratory, Cambridge, MA
  111. Beijing Syndec Instrument Co., China
  112. Electronic Technology Research Insitute, Korea
  113. IDD France
  114. Geotechical Korea Eng. Co., Ltd
  115. North China University of Sciene and Technology
  116. Changjian River Surveying Technology Research Institute, China
  117. Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Korea

GPRSIM software allows the user to design a directional response function for transmitting and receiving antenna. GPR impulse response design/extraction from real radargram is available in a separate menu.
GPRSIM Software is an easy to use radargram simulator, with a complete Windows interface.
GPRSIM has a flexible drawing menu to include circles, semi-circles, ellipses, trenches, and other special functions.  Free hand drawing with lines and splines also makes it easy to insert any kind of subsurface structure the user wants to simulate
GPRSIM has a flexible drawing menu to include circles, semi-circles, ellipses, trenches, and other special functions. Free hand drawing with lines and splines also makes it easy to insert any kind of subsurface structure the user wants to simulate.
GPRSIM  can be used to show how what appear to be very simple structures buried in the ground, can actually have very complicated radar patterns.  In this examples, wave energy with 2 bounces (side reflections RR) create partial hyperbolas from corner reflections
GPRSIM can be used to show how what appear to be very simple structures buried in the ground, can actually have very complicated radar patterns. In this examples, wave energy with 2 bounces (side reflections RR) create partial hyperbolas from corner reflections.
GPRSIM  can be used to model various stages of burial conditions, which is important for studying cemetery sites.
GPRSIM can be used to model various stages of burial conditions, which is an important for studying cemetery sites.
GPRSIM can be effectively used to model layered structures for geological mapping or for geo-engineering surveys across roads and bridge decks
GPRSIM can be effectively used to model layered structures for geological mapping or for geo-engineering surveys across roads and bridge decks.
Simulations of burials can sometimes help to resolve reflection patterns recorded across real burials. In the above example, taken at the Whiterock Jena Choctaw Tribal Cemetery in the Kisatchie National Forest, Louisiana (see page 1 of this website), strong reflections from a suspected coffin are recorded in real data. In addition to the main coffin anomaly, very faint dipping reflections are also observed. These reflections are believed to be from slightly rounhded edges of the burial pit, which causes detection of the corner. In the simulation, one corner of the burial pit is given a rounded edge, causing a dipping reflection that projects towards the center of the pit.
GPRSIM has a processing menu which allows the user to perform linear migration of synthetic radargrams. In the above example, a V-trench which causes complicated radargram patterns is improved from processing. Note, that with perfect synthetic data, pseudo data is mapped into areas where previously no reflections are predicted. In engineering environments with many hyperbolic and regular materials, migration can be a very useful filter process to better predict subsurface structures. In archaeological sites where ground materials are fairly heterogenous, migration has less applicability, but still remains an option as another form of data processing. GPRSIM processing options are useful to visually instruct students on GPR migration and to see the results generated real time.
GPRSIM is useful in teaching users of GPR equipment, how different structures in the ground can appear in the radargrams. "Dinosaurs do not appear as dinosaurs!!"
In this GPR simulation a pipe in a trench located below a layer of rebar in concrete is shown.
In this simulation a pipe in a trench located below a layer of rebar in concrete is shown.
GPRSIM v3.0 was updated in December of 2008 to do GPR simulations over sites with topography.  The user can set any model section as the start location for a simulation.  The possibility of doing simulations in tunnels can also be accomplished with these advanced options.  The software effectively accounts for the antenna tilt and will compensate by rotating/tilting the beam in topographic simulations.
GPRSIM v3.0 was updated in December of 2008 to do GPR simulations over sites with topography. The user can set any model section as the start location for a simulation. The possibility of doing simulations in tunnels can also be accomplished with these advanced options. The software effectively accounts for the antenna tilt and will compensate by rotating/tilting the beam in topographic simulations.